Tag Archives: goth

Tokyo – 5 Wards in 5 Days!

Tokyo is a multi-faceted gem. Avant-garde technology resides right next to minka – traditional wooden houses with tatami mat flooring and sliding doors, modern skyscrapers butt heads with world heritage shrines and temples, smart businesswomen wearing six-inch stilettos and Gucci handbags come face to face with highly trained professional geishas in colourful kimonos and wooden clogs, while international food-chains like McDonalds and Starbucks compete with historic dishes such as sukiyaki, ramen and miso soup.

How to imbibe all these contrasting, yet strangely harmonious cultural traits while getting the most out of one’s vacation? Having spent almost fifteen hours in the air on two interconnecting flights to arrive at my destination, I couldn’t wait to see and experience as much as possible. Five days dedicated to one city seemed like a lot while I was planning my trip, especially since there was so much else to see outside of Tokyo, however once I was there, I realised that cramming everything into five days was actually going to be quite a feat.

The metropolis of Tokyo, formerly known as ‘Edo’, has a nucleus which is made up of 23 ‘wards’ or municipalities. Each of these is worth exploring and offers a multitude of attractions, yet of course, there are wards which are more popular than others. If you have limited time at your disposal, a good way of delving into Tokyo would be to dedicate one day to each particular municipality. While I was researching and planning my visit to the capital of Japan, there were five particular ‘wards’ which piqued my interest most, and which I personally consider to be unmissable.

Shinjuku

Being a major commercial, entertainment and administrative hub, Shinjuku was the first spot I visited when I arrived in Tokyo, directly after depositing the luggage at my accommodation. Needing caffeine and being an anime and manga lover, I couldn’t help but visit a number of related shopping malls, not to mention popular themed spots and stores such as an Alice in Wonderland themed coffee shop and the Sailor Moon official store.

The Sailor Moon Official Store – Shinjuku

Having drunk some coffee and gained some energy after so many hours of travel, I then proceeded to the Metropolitan Plaza near Ikebukuro Station to pick up the Sim card I had booked online while still in Malta. Because yes, you definitely need google maps and google translate to make your way through Japan, a country where less than a quarter of the population knows a word of English. After a relaxing afternoon walking around the beautifully green Shinjuku Gyoen Park, I caught the tube to Omoide Yokocho, also known as ‘Memory Lane’ – a maze of narrow alleys peppered with red lanterns and tiny open restaurants and stalls offering traditional Japanese street-food at worthwhile prices. Previously home to a post-war black market, this is where today tired locals head after a long day at work to unwind with a glass of beer and some yakitori chicken. Golden Gai, a collection of more than 200 mismatched rundown bars lining the alleyways and corners of Shinjuku, is another such spot where one can eat and drink very cheaply surrounded by locals and the occasional celebrity. The nightlife in Shinjuku is loud and friendly. One can also meander to Kabukicho, the red light district a stone’s throw away.

Memory Lane – Shinjuku

Shibuya

The second day of my stay in Tokyo saw me in Shibuya gaping at the very famous Shibuya Crossing, rumored to be the busiest pedestrian intersection in the world, where approximately 2,500 pedestrians cross at one time coming from all directions at once. Momentarily lost in a sea of metropolitan bustle, I made my way to the well-known Takeshita street, landmark of quirky fashion and unique boutiques. Situated in the Harajuku District, it is here that Gothic Lolitas, dressed in their cute frills, lace, Victorian hats and webbed parasols, parade their particular fashion subculture, congregating on Harajuku bridge, eating crepes at one of the many candy shops or shopping for colorful wigs in appropriate costume stores, of which there are many.

Takeshita Street – Shibuya
A Lolita Store in Takeshita Street

Following all the excitement and rush of humanity prevalent in this area, I made my way to the quieter Meiji Jingu Shrine. A green oasis of majestic trees flanked by huge torii gates, this shrine and the adjacent Yoyogi Park offer a surprisingly large forested area within a densely populated city. The shrine, completed in 1920, is dedicated to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken and is perfect for a relaxing stroll.

Meiji Jingu Shrine – Shibuya
Meiji Jingu Shrine

Deciding to spend a kawaii morning, our first stop in Shinjuku after picking up our tickets was the amazing Alice on Wednesday – an Alice in Wonderland themed shop tucked into a side-street but which is quiet large, spreading its magical wares on three floors of girly jewellery in the shape of roses, teacups and top-hats, rabbit mugs, ‘eat me’ and ‘drink me’ cookies, sweets and playing cards, and even handbags in the shape of clocks (I couldn’t help but buying one of these). My boyfriend looked like an elephant in a tea-house, but I appreciate the fact that he waited while I browsed every item minutely, surrounded by other shrieking girls, teens, older women and even toddlers. If you are an Alice in Wonderland aficionado, you can read more about it here.

Asakusa

Craving the vibe of an older, historic Tokyo? Asakusa is the perfect place to imbibe and literally soak in traditional crafts shops, street food stalls, not to mention the classical bath houses or onsen, the famous Japanese hot springs where the natural water contains therapeutic properties and mineral salts said to alleviate a number of health issues. My day began with a trip to a kimono-parlor, where I was outfitted with a yukata – a light cotton summer kimono, the traditional Japanese garment. Having booked this service in advance, I was also served by a hairdresser, who teased my hair into an appropriate style, complete with colorful Japanese hairpins and flowers.

Kimono Store – Asakusa

Declining the extra services of a professional photographer (such parlors always offer this at an augmented price, as well as the use of traditional rickshaws pulled by locals), I made my way on wooden clogs towards Senso-ji Temple nearby. Tourists and even locals were very happy to take photos of me posing in front of this Buddhist temple built in the 7th century. In fact, many of them asked to take photos with me using their own phones as a keepsake, as though I was a tourist attraction myself! The yukata is a surprisingly cool garment considering its floor-length and with full long sleeves, however walking around the enormous temple soon made me hungry and propelled me towards one of the many small ramen-shops lining the street. Ramen soup, made of chicken or pork stock and combined with a variety of ingredients such as whole eggs, seaweed, kombu (kelp), shiitake mushrooms, onions and meat amongst others, is the perfect filling Japanese meal. Tasty and healthy!

Traditional Ramen Soup

Akihabara

Also called the ‘Electric Town’ and situated in Chiyoda ward, is another treasure-trove for all anime, manga, comics and video game lovers, better known as otaku. Home to Mandarake, the largest second-hand comics retailer in the world, this district offers not only shopping centres and computer goods, but also a huge number of what are known as ‘Maid Cafes’, a type of cosplay restaurant where the waitresses are dressed up as kawaii frilly servants redolent of Victorian French maids, as seen through the lens of the prevalent anime aesthetic. A number of rituals and additional food services are available at different maid cafes, which are in no way related to the sex trade, but are merely an innocent way for the itinerant tourist or fan to feel part of a cosplay experience. A number of other anime themed cafes in Akihabara include Gundam Café and the Final Fantasy Erzora café. Gaming arcades and centres are another attraction found in Akihabara. Here one can meet with other gamers, enter contests and even sample the latest gaming technology. Most notable of these arcades are the Sega building and Taito Hey, which specializes in vintage and retro game arcade machines.

Mandarake Store – Akihabara

Ginza

In love with international brands and limited-edition accessories? Then Ginza, full of upmarket boutiques, ritzy cocktail bars and sushi venues, redolent with luxury goods and high-end retailers, is surely the place for you. It is here that French companies such as Chanel, Dior and Louis Vuitton, Italian companies like Gucci, and American bastions of fashion such as Carolina Herrera, have their flagship stores. A number of art-galleries and theatres also predominate, most notably kabuki theatres offering a selection of classical Japanese dance-dramas. Kabuki theatre is known for its historical roots, elaborate masks and make-up and cultural folk tradition dating back to the Edo period (1603 – 1868).

Although I mentioned these five districts in particular, all of Tokyo’s wards offer their own particular flavor. One could go to Ueno prefecture, known for its ornate shrines. Spend the afternoon roaming Tsukiji fish market in Chuo city, eating street-food and perusing stalls at their heart’s content. Another sightseeing gem is Tokyo Imperial Palace, found at the heart of Chiyoda ward. How many days does one need in Tokyo? I don’t think I can really answer this question. Five days were definitely not enough to explore it all. I will be back!

Me and him at Senso-ji Temple – Asakusa

Tokyo – Mad about Alice in Wonderland

Image Source: amazon.co.uk

Tokyo seems to have a soft spot for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. Past the kawaii maid cafes, the manga-lovers’ stores and the typical otaku haunts, one finds a specific niche dedicated to all fans of Wonderland in Japan’s capital city.

Are you a cosplayer? A literature buff? A Walt Disney ‘pro’? Then surely, you might want to take a peek at the deliciously pastel-goth store ‘Alice on Wednesday’. Situated in Shibuya, this cute narrow 3-storey shop will surely please not only young girls but anyone who wishes to tumble down the rabbit-hole, even just to window-shop. Stoop to enter the tiny door leading to Alice’s magical world! Revel in the artistic murals and fantastic colored lights, as you traverse a tunnel-like corridor to access the premises.

The entrance of Alice on Wednesday

Ranging from fancy teacups and saucers to Wonderland-themed accessories such as rabbit pins, earrings sporting miniature hats and handbags with scenes from the eponymous Disney movie, one can also find art depicting John Tenniel’s original illustrations used in Lewis Carroll’s first publishing of ‘Alice’ in 1865.

Special teas found in Alice on Wednesday
Alice on Wednesday – Level One

Take a photo sitting on the Red Queen’s throne, and don’t forget to taste any of the themed sweets, biscuits, or teas on sale!

Alice on Wednesday – Level Two
Sitting on the Red Queen’s Throne

Memorabilia apart, Tokyo also offers a huge number of Alice in Wonderland themed restaurants and coffee shops. Some of the most popular ones are:

+ Alice in a Labyrinth in Ginza
+ Alice in a Fantasy Book in Shinjuku
+ Alice in an Old Castle in Ikebukuro
+ Alice in Magical Land in Shinjuku

We opted to dine at Alice in an Old Castle found in Ikebukuro District within Toshima Ward, since this was closest to our accommodation in Tokyo, plus had good ratings on Tripadvisor. And boy we were not disappointed!

The entrance of Alice in a n Old Castle

The restaurant is simply amazing – a real Wonderland! Decorated with glittering chandeliers, golden-framed mirrors, and plush seats, it gives one the impression of truly being in an enchanted castle. As soon as one enters the deceptively inconsequential door, one is immediately welcomed by an usher dressed either as a Mad Hatter, a rabbit, or even as Alice herself, and escorted to his/her seat. Be warned – themed restaurants like this one are very often full, so make sure to book your table in advance. If you are a tourist (as I was) you can book online.

The beautiful furnishings at Alice in an Old Castle

Human-sized soldier playing cards stand at attention in every corner. Luxurious paintings of Kings and Queens adorn the walls interspersed among red and gold damask drapings. Cosplaying waitresses clap and sing for you as they explain the beautiful menu, which is a work of art in itself. And then there’s the food!

Oh the food! Such a visual explosion of color and taste!

And do not forget to try one of the specially-themed cocktails,

Is Tokyo the real Wonderland? Hmm…

Tokyo – Discovering Shibuya

The metropolis of Tokyo, formerly known as ‘Edo’, has a nucleus which is made up of 23 ‘wards’ or municipalities. Each of these is worth exploring and offers a multitude of attractions, yet of course, there are wards which are more popular than others.

Shibuya Ward, is surely one of the most popular wards in Tokyo, especially with people of a younger age (teens and tweens).

Being a major commercial, entertainment and administrative hub, Shibuya was the first spot I visited when I arrived in Tokyo, directly after depositing the luggage at our accommodation. Since our accommodation was directly next to Ikebukuro Station, it was easy to grab the Fukutoshin Line and navigate through three stops until we arrived directly at Shibuya Station. The journey took less than 15 minutes.

Although we had gone through a tiring journey, having just spent more than 17 hours travelling and waiting at the airport (2.5 hours from Malta to Vienna Airport, 4 hours of layover and then 11 more hours from Vienna to Tokyo Haneda Airport), we were so hyped and excited that we couldn’t not start our first day in Tokyo with a bang, which is why we headed to Shibuya.

At Takeshita Street in Harajuku

We first proceeded to Harajuku to pick up the Sim card we had booked online while still in Malta. Because yes, you definitely need google maps and google translate to make your way through Japan, a country where less than a quarter of the population knows a word of English. We had also booked a shinkansen trip from Tokyo to Kyoto (online as well) from the same company, so we picked the tickets up as well.

Gothic Lolita shops in Harajuku

Momentarily lost in a sea of metropolitan bustle, we made our way through the well-known Takeshita Street, landmark of quirky fashion and unique boutiques. Situated in the Harajuku District within Shibuya, it is here that Gothic Lolitas, dressed in their cute frills, lace, Victorian hats and webbed parasols, parade their particular fashion subculture, congregating on Harajuku bridge, eating crepes at one of the many candy shops or shopping for colorful wigs in appropriate costume stores, of which there are many.

Entering Alice on Wednesday

We couldn’t help but stop and stare at each and every store, but I admit I was actually too overwhelmed to buy anything at first. That is, until we arrived at the amazing Alice on Wednesday – an Alice in Wonderland themed store tucked into a side-street. It is quiet large, spreading its magical wares on three floors of girly jewelery in the shape of roses, teacups and top-hats, rabbit mugs, ‘eat me’ and ‘drink me’ cookies, sweets and playing cards, and even handbags in the shape of clocks (I couldn’t help but buying one of these). One is immediately immersed into Wonderland as s/he navigates through a very tiny door to enter the store. A grinning Cheshire cat greets you at the entrance as you walk through a mirror-filled corridor. My poor six-foot boyfriend looked like an elephant in a tea-house, but I appreciated the fact that he waited while I browsed every item minutely, surrounded by other shrieking girls, teens, older women and even toddlers staining at their mothers’ restraining arms.

Beautiful items for sale at Alice on Wednesday
On the Queen’s Throne! (I prefer Alice to the foolish Queen of Hearts, but there you go)

Following our adventures in ‘Wonderland’, we made our way down the colorful streets to the official Sailor Moon store. Found in the Laforet building, this shop is quiet small and holds mostly knick knacks and items which are out of production and therefore not for sale. I admit that I was very disappointed. It was fun to window shop but there was nothing worth buying. I DID purchase a lot of Sailor Moon memorabilia later on from Mandarake (a large comic book store found in Akihabara Ward) as well as at the Universal Studios in Osaka, but that took place later on during our stay in Japan.

The Sailor Moon Store in the Laforet Building

Of course, we couldn’t visit Shibuya and NOT take a look at the very famous Shibuya Crossing, rumored to be the busiest pedestrian intersection in the world, where approximately 2,500 pedestrians cross at one time coming from all directions at once. Although the spot is interesting, it IS very hectic, so we clicked madly on our cameras for five minutes and then continued on our way.

The Shibuya Crossing

Following all the excitement and rush of humanity prevalent at the crossing, we made our way to the quieter Meiji Jingu Shrine. A green oasis of majestic trees flanked by huge torii gates, this shrine and the adjacent Yoyogi Park offer a surprisingly large forested area within a densely populated city. The shrine, completed in 1920, is dedicated to Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken and is perfect for a relaxing stroll. It was our first encounter with a Shinto Shrine, and it was truly an experience.

The grounds at Meiji Jingu Shrine

The grounds of Meiji Jingu Shrine can be accessed through two main entrances, both marked by a huge welcoming Torii Gate.  The North entrance is very close to Yoyogi Station, while the South entrance is directly next to JR Harajuku Station. As I walked beneath the Torii gate, the sounds and smells of the busy city were quickly muffled and replaced by the scent of grass and the shuffling of leaves crowding the huge green forest leading up to the shrine. The idyllic serenity and quiet prevalent at the shrine totally clashed with the previous chaos of Shibuya’s urban landscape, and served to highlight the two faces of Tokyo – modern metropolis and spiritual center.

Meiji Jingu Shrine – Tokyo’s Spiritual Core

P.S Don’t think that just because I did not buy anything at the Sailor Moon store, it is not worth visiting! It was still amazing and if you are a fan, you should definitely pop in!

Out of Production Sailor Moon memorabilia

Shopping at Camden Town

It is an undeniable fact that most people annually visit London for no other reason than to re-stock their wardrobe. Although personally, my priorities are mostly somewhat different, I must say that in my case too, a trip to London generally always manages to entice me in dedicating at least half a day to shopping. Although perhaps – not in such a conventional way. While the most mainstream shoppers turn their eager faces towards Oxford Street, my two feet always tend to lead me towards what is known as the capital of alternative fashion, that is, Camden Town.

Camden High Street

Camden Town, situated in North-West London, is an inner city district famous for its alternative style and eccentric markets. In fact, here one can find anything ranging from burlesque costumes to gothic apparel, from punk clothing to cyber accessories, from vintage furniture to hippy and ethnic piercings.

Arriving at Camden Town tube station

It is quite easy to visit Camden Town – just take the London Underground, following the Northern Line (that is, the black-colored one as shown on tube-maps). Camden is to be found between the two stops named ‘Camden Town’ and ‘Chalk Farm’. Although either stop is fine, I would personally suggest stopping at Camden Town tube station, since this will leave you exactly on Camden High Street. Chock-full with gothic dresses, rockabilly jewellery and tattoo parlors, this main street offers not only a great first impression to the curious shopper, but more importantly, it plays an important part in what I like to call ‘the bargaining game’. This is because while fixed prices are certainly set for each item found within the impressive shops lining the main street, the vendors found manning the stalls in the other markets within Camden Town, not only accept, but almost invite bargaining. When one is aware of the actual fixed price and value of an item, one has at least an idea of the starting point for one’s haggling.

Camden High Street

As I already mentioned, there are a number of different markets within Camden Town itself. Let us paint a mental map and imagine it all. We leave Camden Town Tube Station and start strolling down the main road. The shops lined on both sides of the street are themselves a sight to behold, since most of them sport sculptured representations of their own products on the buildings themselves. Suddenly, an opening on the right-hand side of the street presents us with a crazy medley of street stalls and perky vendors. The title ‘Camden Market’ is written over it all, even though this busy motley was originally known as the ‘Buck Street Market’. Here you can browse and haggle to your heart’s content, but beware – these sellers are a wily lot! The last time I was in Camden, no less than three different vendors, one after the other, tried to entrap me in deals I did not want, by telling me that since I was their ‘first customer of the day’ they would give me ‘a special treatment’. Strange thing to say, since I was there at 2 in the afternoon! Another guy started flattering me, saying that I had the perfect figure for the coat I was trying on, only to turn around and say exactly the same thing to the overweight old lady behind me! Tricks of the trade which one should be on the look-out for, though to be honest, they serve as fodder for a good laugh as well.

The Camden Market

On the other side of the Camden Town market stalls is a tiny market which mostly sells vegetables and local produce, as well as t-shirts, handbags and shoes. This is known as the Inverness Street Market, and has been colouring Camden Town since the beginning of the 1900s.

Moving on, we come to the most idyllic and picturesque part of Camden Town, that is, Camden Lock Market. Situated by the Regent’s Canal, the Lock Market, also known as the crafts market, offers a number of semi-permanent stalls selling musical instruments, wooden toys, flower soaps, ethnic décor, artwork, semi-precious stones, Celtic designs, leather creations, and other curios. For the musically-inclined, this market also offers a huge number of rock memorabilia.

Camden Lock Market
Camden Lock

At this point in my shopping-spree, after having bought all I can reach and with more to come, I’m usually famished. The main yard in the middle of Camden Lock Market offers a wide variety of take-away food, often ‘alternative’ in and of itself. It was here that I first tasted crocodile meat, as well as zebra kebabs. Indian and Moroccan food abounds, as do fish paella, American burgers and German sausages. My favorite however, will always be the food for which London is most renowned – the traditional fish and chips.

Stables Market

With our appetite assuaged, we continue our visit by crossing over from Camden Lock Market to what is known as the Camden Lock Village. Situated on the other side of the lock itself, the village is full of stalls presenting not just hand-made decorations and clothes, but also still more alternative fashions and footwear, as well as casual-wear, and more. Finally, when one continues going down the street, one arrives at Stables Market, which is the first market one encounters if one stops at Chalk Farm Tube Station. This market, so-named because it is a former horse-hospital, focuses on alternative fashion and clothes. The huge number of shops, more than 700 in fact, specialize in exceptional styles and particular stores. These range from Sai Sai, a shop perfect for those who want to explore the Gothic Lolita lifestyle, to Cyberdog, which like a club, provides shows given by dancers, colored laser-lights and loud music, while selling cyber clothing and accessories upstairs, and adult toys and lingerie downstairs.

Cyberdog

Camden Town is a must-visit when one is in London, and not just for alternative- fashion lovers. Watching the myriad of different people going about their everyday lives, basking in such an atmosphere, is a great experience in and of itself. Camden Town also has an important part to play in the Britpop and rock movements, since many musicians and bands have lived or played there at some point. The nightlife in Camden is in fact another highlight. Clubs like Underworld and the Electric Ballroom (which also serves as an indoor market during the day) host a number of monthly gigs and concerts. However, remember not to get completely carried away, since the last tube leaves Camden Station at around 1am!

Thinking about what to buy!

All these markets in such a small part of London, and all of them open 7 days a week. To be sure, there are more stalls during the weekend, but believe me, even shopping on a week-day will ensure a full day of bauble-buying and bargain-hunting. Definitely a must-visit for every fashion-minded adventurer!

This article was originally published on The Sunday Times

Remembering Utrecht

Following the Dutch shooting which took place on a tram in Utrecht three days ago (read all about it here), I can’t help but remember the beautiful day I spent in Utrecht when I visited in December 2017.

It was a clear crisp winter day. The sun was shining, white snow lay everywhere from the previous night, the air was refreshing, and the cobbled streets of the medieval city center bustled with joyous students on bikes, excited tourists and busy locals. The scent of freshly baked bread was in the air, and colorful flowers adorned many shop-fronts.

The canals were so pretty in the early morning light! It is such a romantic city.

My first stop was gothic Saint Martin’s Cathedral. Although the current cathedral was built in the 13th century, it rests on a much older church which had been damaged in a fire. The church itself had been built on the ruins of a Roman fortress.

The cathedral’s vaulted interiors, stained glass and beautiful sculptures are really a sight to behold, and I was truly enchanted by the atmosphere of mystery and historical meaning attached to it.

Apart from the Cathedral, another amazing stop in Utrecht is the Dom Tower, which is the tallest church tower in the Netherlands. The tower was built in the 14th century to showcase the power of the city, and with its 14 enormous bells and incredible height, it surely does that!

Unfortunately I was suffering from severe back problems caused by a slipped disc at the time, so I wasn’t able to climb up the 465 steps to the top of the Dom Tower (there is no lift). Instead, I walked around the city, enjoying its flavor.

Needless be said, I somehow gravitated towards the local bookstore (for those who haven’t taken a peek at the ‘About Me‘ section yet, I’m a total bookworm and book-hoarder) and I took the opportunity to purchase Isabel Allende’s ‘Eva Luna’, which I had been hankering after for some time.

After walking around some more, I stopped at a pretty little bar for my lunch, and even tried out one of the local beers.

There are many other attractions to be found in the city, such as the Central Museum, the Railway Museum, the underground archaeological ruins, Utrecht Botanic Garden and the Grand Canal, among others.

Later on in the day, after having enjoyed roaming around the city to my heart’s content, I visited the Castle De Haar, which is to be found around half an hour away (by car) from the city itself. This fairytale location however deserves a blogpost of its own,… more later 🙂